Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

menstruationRefers to physical and emotional symptoms that occur in the one to two weeks before a woman’s period. Symptoms often vary between women and resolve around the start of bleeding. Common symptoms include acne, tender breasts, bloating, feeling tired, irritability, and mood changes. Often symptoms are present for around six days. A woman’s pattern of symptoms may change over time.

Symptoms

The list of potential signs and symptoms for premenstrual syndrome is long, but most women only experience a few of these problems.

Emotional symptoms

  • Tension or anxiety
  • Depressed mood
  • Crying spells
  • Mood swings and irritability or anger
  • Appetite changes and food cravings
  • Trouble falling asleep (insomnia)
  • Social withdrawal
  • Poor concentration

Physical symptoms

  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Weight gain related to fluid retention
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Breast tenderness
  • Acne flare-ups
  • Constipation or diarrhea

For some, the physical pain and emotional stress are severe enough to affect their daily lives. Regardless of symptom severity, the signs and symptoms generally disappear within four days of the start of the menstrual period for most women.

But a small number of women with premenstrual syndrome have disabling symptoms every month. This form of PMS is called premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

PMDD signs and symptoms include depression, mood swings, anger, anxiety, feeling overwhelmed, difficulty concentrating, irritability and tension.

Causes

The cause of PMS is largely related to oestrogen and progesterone. During the first half of the cycle oestrogen is the dominant hormone. It is the hormone responsible for ovulation. In the mid-cycle when the egg is released progesterone is secreted and becomes the dominant hormone inhibiting the action of oestrogen. The role of progesterone is to prepare the endometrial lining to receive a fertilised egg. If the egg in fertilised then more progesterone is produced. However, if the egg is not fertilised then progesterone levels fall and the endometrial lining sheds and menstruation occurs. In the final two weeks after ovulation if the oestrogen:progesterone ratio is unbalanced with too much oestrogen and too little progesterone then PMS symptoms appear.

Treatment

Natural or bioidentical hormones can help restore progesterone levels. Our compounding pharmacist can formulate these as a transdermal cream, capsule or pessary.

Our compounding pharmacists offer advise and, if preferred, private consolations to help women understand their own health needs. Our pharmacists can guide you on how to live a healthier lifestyle and avoid health problems that typically affect women.

Contact us or call us to book a free consultation with our compounding pharmacist.

QCPP logo

error: Content is protected !!
%d bloggers like this: